EPA Compliance

    

WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW


Current NSW EPA Legislation calls for the labeling of all aftermarket exhaust systems.
99% of Staintune systems are compliant under the Stationary Noise Test i.e. Are under
The legal requirement at the test RPM for the bike they are intended for.

If you have received the label with this notice simply find a suitable location for the label.
Labels must be placed on the Staintune product, the best place is the Staintune mounting bracket. In some cases there is not enough space on the muffler mount bracket to apply the label. If this is the case find a location as close to the Staintune Product as possible.

Please Note: Do not place labels on the muffler body or inlet tubes or any other extreme heat area this will help prevent the labels adhesive from burning and falling off.

Should you need a Label re- issued for yourself or a friend with a Staintune pipe you can
Simply, Phone, fax, email or post your request, There is now a $20 fee for this service.

Please provide the following info when ordering a replacement Compliance Label:

You can copy and past below form and e-mail to sales@staintune.com.au


Make…………………………..…Model….………………………..Year…………………

Original Stationary test info off bikes Label! .Test RPM………………DBA………......

Your Name……………………………………………….Phone no………………………..

Address………………………………………..................City...............................................

State …………Postcode………………Rego No……………Vin……………………..…..

Purchased from…………………………………………………………………………..….

Label Supplied with pipes Yes………. No……….

IMPORTANT: Most Staintune Mufflers are only compliant with the restrictors supplied in place,Engine wear and induction system modifications may change the outcome of a stationary noise test.It is the users responsibility to maintain and keep the vehicles exhaust system in good working order.

If you are at all concerned with the effectiveness of your silencing system please contact Staintune or your local EPA facility for Dba testing.

The noise level for motorcycles before March 1984 is 100 decibels.

• For motorcycles built on or After 1 March 1984, and designed or manufactured for use on a road,the level is 94 decibels.

• For vehicles certified to ADR 83/00 and with compliance plate dates of 1 September 2011 or earlier, the prescribed noise level is the higher of either the level in Schedule1 or the ADR 83/00 signature level plus 5 decibels.

• For vehicles with compliance plate dates after 1 September 2011, the prescribed noise level is the ADR 83/00



Prescribed noise levels for exhaust noise:
Exhaust noise from vehicles should not exceed the prescribed noise levels referred to in clause 4 of the Regulation. The levels depend on whether the vehicle is certified to Australian Design Rule (ADR) 83/00(which came into force progressively from 2005), or to earlier ADRs. For vehicles certified prior to ADR 83/00


• The noise level for motorcycles before March 1984 is 100 decibels.

• For motorcycles built on or After 1 March 1984, and designed or manufactured for use on a road,the level is 94 decibels.

• For vehicles certified to ADR 83/00 and with compliance plate dates of 1 September 2011 or earlier, the prescribed noise level is the higher of either the level in Schedule1 or the ADR 83/00 signature level plus 5 decibels.

• For vehicles with compliance plate dates after 1 September 2011, the prescribed noise level is the ADR 83/00 signature level plus 5 decibels

.ADR83/00 signature noise levels can be found on the federal Department of Infrastructure and Transport’s website at www.infrastructure.gov.au/roads/environment/noise.aspx. When the prescribed noise limits are exceeded, EPA authorized officers can issue penalty notices for offences. There is a tiered scale for fines – the louder the exhaust noise from vehicles, the greater the penalty (see Table 1).You can ensure that the exhaust noise from your vehicle is acceptable by regularly maintaining your exhaust equipment (i.e. mufflers) and avoiding fitting non-standard components that cause increased exhaust noise


Defective noise control equipment:
Vehicle owners and operators should ensure that their vehicles are not fitted with defective ‘noise control
equipment’ (Clause 18 of the Regulation). Noise control equipment covers both exhaust systems and engine
components. Defective equipment is defined as equipment that.

• allows gas to escape from a place other than the intended exhaust outlet
• allows the emission of more noise than the original

noise control equipment fitted by the vehicle manufacturer and, if the equipment is part of the
exhaust system, an authorized officer reasonably believes its noise level is above the prescribed level, or

• has been modified in a way that an authorized officer reasonably believes makes it less effective than it
would have been if it hadn’t been modified, and, if the equipment is part of the exhaust system, an authorized
officer reasonably believes its noise level is above the prescribed level.

Clause 18 of the Regulation also makes it an offence if a vehicle’s noise control equipment is not securely in place
or is removed and not replaced. This means exhaust system components (such as mufflers and baffles) and
other noise control equipment fitted to the engine must be properly fixed in place and not be missing


Exhaust systems:
Listen to the exhaust system when buying a vehicle. If the vehicle sounds noisier than unmodified vehicles of the
same make and model, the exhaust system may have been altered. If in doubt, make inquiries. The system should be replaced with a quieter system when, for example:

• the exhaust system has been replaced with an excessively loud system such as a sports system, or
• the baffles have been altered or removed from the muffler so the vehicle is noisier.

Get the noise level checked by a suitably qualified person such as a licensed muffler repairer, EPA approved
mechanic or RMS licensed vehicle certifier. Remember that more noise does not mean more power but can
mean more annoyance. Any increase in noise could result in you being fined. The Regulation also makes it an offence to use temporary noise reduction devices or packing in vehicle exhausts. This includes items such as baffles in the exhaust system that have not been welded/riveted in place, or items that are adjustable such as valves, or materials introduced into the exhaust system, such as steel wool. These items must not be used.
However a defence is provided for any:

• vehicle that, at the time of manufacture, had items such as baffles that were not welded or riveted in place or an
adjustable device in the exhaust system, or a replacement that is equivalent to that fitted by the manufacturer
• motorcycle that has items such as baffles that are bolted or otherwise securely fastened in place

Vehicle noise testing:
The EPA has introduced a Noise Testing and Anti-tampering Scheme (www.epa.nsw.gov.au/noise/NTATIS.htm) that includes the establishment of EPA Approved Inspection Stations. If the police reasonably
believe that a vehicle is noisy, they can refer the vehicle to the EPA. The EPA may then require the vehicle to be
presented at an Approved Inspection Station for noise testing and inspection of the noise control and pollution
control equipment. The test will indicate whether the vehicle complies with the prescribed noise level for that
vehicle (and whether pollution control, and noise control equipment is defective, missing or has been impaired).
Penalties for exceeding prescribed noise levels are shown in Table 1.

Federal Department of
Infrastructure and
Transport
phone: (02) 6274 7111

Police
Police Assistance Line
phone: 131 444

Environment Protection
Authority (EPA)
EPA Environment Line:
131 555 (local call cost – NSW
only) or (02) 9995 5000

Roads and Maritime
Services
phone: 131 782

Environment Protection
Authority
59 Goulburn Street
PO Box A290
Sydney South 1232
Phone: (02) 9995 5000
(switchboard)
Phone: 131 555